BALL.B 1st semester

BALL.B 1st semester

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

B.A.LLB

1st Semester

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                  English – I

(General English)

 

Paper-I [Code – BLB101C]                                                        Max. Marks = 100

Time Duration: 3 Hours                                                             Theory = 80

      Continuous Assessment = 20

 

 

Note: The subject includes a comprehensive and up to date study of various aspects of English. The question paper shall be of 80 marks, spread over the whole syllabus, and shall comprise of three sections. Section A (very short answer type questions in about 10-20 words) shall have 10 questions, two questions from each unit carrying 2 marks each. Section B (short answer type questions in about 200-250 words) shall have 5 questions, one question from each unit carrying 6 marks each. All questions from sections A and B have to be answered. Section C (long answer type questions in about 400-500 words) shall have 5 questions, one from each unit carrying 10 marks each. Any three questions out of 5 have to be answered from this section.

 

Objective: The objective of this paper is to introduce the basics of English language and communication to the law student. It will also help the student to develop his/her writing skills, particularly in relation to legal terminology.

 

Unit-I

                            I.     Language and Communication.

                         II.     Barriers in Communication.

                      III.     Body Language or Non-Verbal Communication.

 

 

Unit-II

                            I.     Interpersonal Communication.

                         II.     Small Group Communication.

                      III.     Listening Effectively to Other Speakers.

 

 

Unit-III

                            I.     Using Legal Terminology in Oral and Written Communication.

                         II.     Using Legal Dictionary.

                      III.     Comprehending and Summarizing Texts Related to Legal Matters.

                      IV.     Developing a Written Text from Notes.

 

Unit-IV

                            I.     Writing Formal Letters and Memoranda.

                         II.     Writing Reports.

                      III.     Writing Legal Documents: Deeds, Appeals etc.

 

Unit-V

                            I.          Pronunciation of English: Word, Syllable, and Stress.

                         II.          English Intonation.

                      III.          English Words and Sentences for Practice in Pronunciation.

 

 

Recommended Readings

 

1.      Larry L Barker, Communication (Prentice Hall).

2.      Akmajina, Demers, Farmer and Harnish, Linguistics: An Introduction to Language and Communication (Prentice Hall).

3.      Raymond Murphy, Murphys English Grammar (3rd ed.) with CD (Cambridge University Press).

4.      OConnor, Better English Pronunciation (with Cassettes) (Cambridge University Press).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                 Economics –I

Paper-II [Code – BLB102C]                                                            Max. Marks = 100

Time Duration: 3 Hours                                                             Theory = 80

      Continuous Assessment = 20

                                               

Note: The subject includes a comprehensive and up to date study of various aspects of Economics. The question paper shall be of 80 marks, spread over the whole syllabus, and shall comprise of three sections. Section A (very short answer type questions in about 10-20 words) shall have 10 questions, two questions from each unit carrying 2 marks each. Section B (short answer type questions in about 200-250 words) shall have 5 questions, one question from each unit carrying 6 marks each. All questions from sections A and B have to be answered. Section C (long answer type questions in about 400-500 words) shall have 5 questions, one from each unit carrying 10 marks each. Any three questions out of 5 have to be answered from this section.

Objective: This course is designed to provide basic understanding of microeconomic concepts and theories, behaviour of economic agents vis consumer and producer, different market structures, factor pricing and concepts related to population, poverty and human resource development.

UNIT-I: General Economics

                   I.             Economics: An Introduction, Micro and Macro-Economics.

                II.            Central Problems of an Economy, Economic Systems: Capitalism, Socialism & mixed economic system.

             III.             Economics and Law.

UNIT-II: Utility, Demand and Supply                                                             

                   I.             Utility: ordinal and cardinal, Law of Diminishing Marginal Utility

                II.             Demand: concept and Determinants, Law of Demand, Elasticity of Demand:

     Measurement.

             III.             Supply: concept and determinants. law of Supply, Elasticity of Supply:

     Measurement

UNIT-III: Costs, production and Markets

                I.   Costs of production: Concept and Types.

             II.   Factors of Production, Basic Production Function, laws of Production.

          III.   Classification of Markets: Monopoly, Perfect Competitions, Monopolistic 

Competition, Duopoly and Oligopoly.

UNIT-IV: National Income

          I.            National Income: Meaning and concepts.

       II.            Methods of measuring National Income:

a.       Income method;

b.      Expenditure Method;

c.       Product Method.

UNIT-V: Poverty and Human development

I.          poverty Concept: absolute and Relative. Measurement of Absolute Poverty  

(Head Count Index and Poverty Gap Methods); Human Poverty Index and its Construction

II.          Income Inequality Concept. Measurement of Inequality (Size Distribution, Lorenz Curve and Gini Cofficient).

III.    Human development: Concept. Components of Human Development. Human              Development Index and Its Construction.

 

Recommended Readings

1.      Robert cooter Thomas ulen, Law and Economics (pearson Education) Pashupati Printers Pvt. Ltd.

2.      K. C Gopalakrishnan Ramdas, Economics for Law Students (National Law school of india, bar council of india Trust), Eastern Book Company.

3.      M. L. Jhingan, Micro Economics Theory, Vrinda Publications (P) Ltd.

4.      K.K Dewett, Modern Economic Theory, S Chand and Company Ltd.

5.      Micheal P. Tadaro & Stephen C. Smith, Economic Development, Pearson Education Ltd.

6.      Richard T. Froyen, Macro Economics Theories and policies, Pearson Education Ltd.

7.      S. R. Myneni, Economics for Law Students, Allahabad Law Agency.

8.      Samueleson Nordhas, Economics, Tata Mcgraw-Hill.

9.      A. Koutsoyiannis, Modern Micro Economics, Macmillan Press Ltd.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

History – I

Paper III [Code – BLB 103C]                                                   Max Marks = 100

Time Duration: 3 Hours                                                            Theory = 80

                                                                                                     Continuous Assessment = 20

 

Note: The subject includes a comprehensive and up to date study of various aspects of History. The question paper shall be of 80 marks, spread over the whole syllabus, and shall comprise of three sections. Section A (very short answer type questions in about 10-20 words) shall have 10 questions, two questions from each unit carrying 2 marks each. Section B (short answer type questions in about 200-250 words) shall have 5 questions, one question from each unit carrying 6 marks each. All questions from sections A and B have to be answered. Section C (long answer type questions in about 400-500 words) shall have 5 questions, one from each unit carrying 10 marks each. Any three questions out of 5 have to be answered from this section.

 

Objective: This paper focuses on broad feature of institutions and administrative structures in ancient and medieval India.

Unit I - Definition and Early Indian History

I.            What is History?

II.         Sources of Indian History.

III.      Indus Valley Civilization.

IV.      Social, Economic, Political and Religious Life during Rig Vedic and Later Vedic Period.

Unit II - History and Law

I.            Relevance of History to Law: Interdisciplinary Approach.

II.         Rethinking History and Historian’s Craft.

III.      Indian Historiography: Orientalist, Utilitarians, Nationalists, Marxist, Religious Nationalist, Subalterns and Regional Histories.

Unit III - Ancient India

I.            State, Polity and Governance: Nature of State, Notions of Kingship (Brahminic, Buddhist, Kautalyan).

II.         Age of Mauryas and Guptas.

III.      Kinship, Caste and Class: Social Differentiation, Family, Patriliny, Rules of Marriage, Gotra, Jatis and Varnas, Access to Property and Gender.

IV.      Religious Traditions and Polity: Brahminism, Buddhism, Jainism.

 

Unit IV - Medieval India

I.            Kings and their Courts.

A.     Cholas: Local Self-Government.

B.     Delhi Sultanate: Theory of Kingship (Balban) and Administrative Apparatus.

C.     Vijayanagara State

D.    Mughals: Theory of Sovereignty (Akbar) and Administrative Structure.

II.         Bhakti-Sufi Tradition in relation with the State and Reconfiguration of Identity.

III.      Peasant, Zamindars and the State: Market Reforms of Alauddin Khilji, Agrarian Reforms of Akbar.

Unit V - The Concept of Justice and Judicial Institutions in Ancient and Medieval India

I.            Sources of Law in Ancient India: Concept and Sources of Dharma, Veda, Dharmasutra, Dharma Shastra, Tradition and Good Custom, Types of Courts and Procedures.

II.         Legal Thinkers of Ancient India: Manu and Yajnavalkya.

III.      Legal Traditions in Medieval India: Sources of Islamic Law (Quran, Hadis, Ijma, Qiyas), Salient Features of Islamic Criminal Law, Hanafi School of Thought.

 

Recommended Reading

1.       H.V. Sreenivasa Murthy, History of India, Eastern Book Company.

2.       E.H. Carr, What is History, Penguin

3.       Sabyasachi Bhattacharya (ed.), Approaches to History: Essays in Indian Historiography, Primus Books.

4.       Romila Thapar, Time as a Metaphor of History, OUP.

5.       Romila Thapar, Early India: From the Origins to AD 1300, University of California Press.

6.       Satish Chandra, Medieval India, Vol. I, Har-Anand.

7.       Satish Chandra, Medieval India, Vol. II, Har-Anand

8.       Satish Chandra, History of Medieval India, Orient Blackswan

9.       Bipan Chandra, India’s Struggle for Independence, 1857-1947, Penguin.

 

 

 

Political Science-I

 

Paper-IV [Code – BLB 104C]                                      Max. Marks = 100

Time Duration: 3 Hours                                                       Theory = 80

Continuous Assessment = 20

 

 

Note: The subject includes a comprehensive and up to date study of various aspects of Political Science. The question paper shall be of 80 marks, spread over the whole syllabus, and shall comprise of three sections. Section A (very short answer type questions in about 10-20 words) shall have 10 questions, two questions from each unit carrying 2 marks each. Section B (short answer type questions in about 200-250 words) shall have 5 questions, one question from each unit carrying 6 marks each. All questions from sections A and B have to be answered. Section C (long answer type questions in about 400-500 words) shall have 5 questions, one from each unit carrying 10 marks each. Any three questions out of 5 have to be answered from this section.

Objective: This paper focuses on understanding the basic concept of political science, primarily its relation with law and other social sciences. It also deals with basic concept, theories and functions of state.

Unit - I

      I.    Political Science: Nature and Scope.

   II.    Relationship between Political Science and Law.

 III.    Traditional Approaches: Philosophical and Legal-Institutional

 IV.    Modern Approaches Behavouralism and Post – Behavouralism.

Unit - II

         I.     State: Nature and Elements of State.

      II.     Origin of State: Divine Origin Theory, Evolutionary Theory and Social Contract Theory.

   III.     Concepts or Laissez Faire, Socialist and Welfare State.

 

Unit - III

      I.    Sovereignty: Meaning and Features.

   II.    Theories of Sovereignty: Monistic and Pluralistic.

 

Unit - IV

      I.    Democracy: Meaning and Types.

   II.    Forms of Government - Parliamentary and Presidential.

 

 

Unit - V

          I.     Liberty: Significance of Liberty: Negative and Positive Liberty

       II.     Equality: Meaning and Types

    III.     Justice: Meaning. Legal and Social Distributive Justice.

Recommended Readings

1. A.C. Kapoor, Principles of Political Science.

2. Andrew Heywood, Politics.

3. Andrew Heywood, Political Theory.

4. Harlod Laski, Grammar of Politics.

5. O.P. Gauba, An Introduction to Political Theory.

6. S.P. Verma, Modern Political Theory.

7. Rajeev Bhargava & Ashok  Acharaya, Introduction to Political Theory.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Law of Torts, Motor Vehicles Act and Consumer Protection Act

Paper: V [Code – BLB 105C]                                                     Max. Marks: 100

Time allowed: 3 hours                                                                 Theory: 80                                                                                                                                         Continuous Assessment: 20                                                                                                                

 

Note: The subject includes a comprehensive and up to date study of various aspects of Law of Torts including how its’ principles manifest and implement themselves in Motor Vehicle and Consumer Protection Law. The question paper shall be of 80 marks, spread over the whole syllabus, and shall comprise of three sections. Section A (very short answer type questions in about 10-20 words) shall have 10 questions, two questions from each unit carrying 2 marks each. Section B (short answer type questions in about 200-250 words) shall have 5 questions, one question from each unit carrying 6 marks each. All questions from sections A and B have to be answered. Section C (long answer type questions in about 400-500 words) shall have 5 questions, one from each unit carrying 10 marks each. Any three questions out of 5 have to be answered from this section. 30 percent of the questions will be problem based.

 

Objective: This paper is to make students understand the nature of torts and conditions of liability with references to established case law. Further, it covers how the principles of tort law manifest and implement themselves in Motor Vehicle and Consumer Protection law.

Unit-1

              I.     Nature and Definition of Law of Torts.

           II.     Difference between Tort and Crime/ Tort and Breach of Contract.

        III.     Basis of Tortuous Liability.

a.      Ubi Jus Ibi Remedium.

b.      Injuria Sine Damnum and Damnum Sine Injuria. 

 IV.            Principles of Vicarious Liability

a.    Master – Servant Relationship.

b.   Principal - Agent Relationship.

c.    Liability of State: Doctrine of Sovereign Immunity.

d.   Joint Tort Liabilities and Payment of Damages.

    V.            Strict Liability and Absolute Liability.

 

Unit-II - General Defences for the Tortuous Liability

         I.          Volenti non fit injuria

      II.          Vis Major (Act of God)

   III.          Inevitable Accident

   IV.          Necessity

      V.          Private Defence 

 

 

Unit III - Torts against Human Beings

                   I.     Negligence and Contributory Negligence.

                II.     Nuisance.

             III.     Defamation.

             IV.     Trespass

 

 

Unit IV – Motor Vehicle Act

                   I.     Overview of the Motor Vehicle Act.

                II.     Rule of Payment of Compensation.

             III.     Fault Based Liability.

             IV.     No – Fault Liability.

                V.     Liability of Insurer

             VI.     Claims Tribunal.

          VII.     Salient Features of Motor Vehicle (Amendment) Bill, 2016.

 

Unit-V - The Consumer Protection Act, 1986

                   I.     Salient Features and Aims and Objectives.

                II.     Basic Concepts – Consumer, Service, Goods, Defects in Goods, Deficiency in Services.

             III.     Redressal Agencies and Remedies.

             IV.     Distinctive features of J&K Consumer Protection Act 1987.

 

Recommended Readings

1.      Winfield, Law of Torts

2.      Sinha, Law of Torts

3.      Avatar Singh, Law of Torts

4.      Bangia, R.K, Law of Torts, Allahabad Law Agency

5.      Heuston, R.F.V, Salmond on the Law of Torts

6.      Ratan Lal & Deeraj Lal, The Law of Torts, Lexis Nexis Butterworths Wadhwa, Nagpur.

7.      Annual Survey of Indian Law, Indian Law Institute, New Delhi.

 



 

 

 

 

 

Law of Crimes-I

(General Principles)

 

 

Paper: VI [Code – BLB 106C]                                                 Max Marks = 100

Time Duration: 3 Hours                                                            Theory = 80

                                                                                                     Continuous Assessment = 20

 

 

Note: The subject includes a comprehensive and up to date study of various aspects of Law of Crimes. The question paper shall be of 80 marks, spread over the whole syllabus, and shall comprise of three sections. Section A (very short answer type questions in about 10-20 words) shall have 10 questions, two questions from each unit carrying 2 marks each. Section B (short answer type questions in about 200-250 words) shall have 5 questions, one question from each unit carrying 6 marks each. All questions from sections A and B have to be answered. Section C (long answer type questions in about 400-500 words) shall have 5 questions, one from each unit carrying 10 marks each. Any three questions out of 5 have to be answered from this section. 30 percent of the questions will be problem based.

 

Objective: This paper is to deal with the basic principles of criminal law determining criminal liability and punishment.

 

Unit-I

              I.     Nature and Concept of Criminal Law.

           II.     Elements of Criminal Liability.

A.  Actus Reus

B.  Mens Rea

        III.     Definitions under sections 21,22,23,24,25,39,40 and 52 of IPC.

 

Unit II - General Defences-I

              I.     Judicial and Executive Acts.

           II.     Accident.

        III.     Necessity and Compulsion.

        IV.     Infancy.

 

Unit III - General Defences-II

              I.     Insanity.

           II.     Intoxication.

        III.     Consent.

        IV.     Right of Private Defence.

 

 

 

Unit-IV

              I.     Group Liability under Sections 34-38 and 149,150,151 of the IPC.

           II.     Unlawful Assembly, Rioting and Affray

        III.     Criminal Conspiracy: Section 120A and 120B of IPC

        IV.     Abetment: Section 107-120 IPC

           V.     Offences against State: Sections 121,124A.

 

Unit V 

              I.     Promoting enmity between classes: Section 153AA

           II.     Offences by or relating to public servants.

        III.     Contempt of the lawful authority : Section 172-180, 183-189

        IV.     Criminal Attempt: Sections 511 and 307 of IPC

A.  Attempt when Punishable.

B.  Tests for Determining what Constitutes Attempt.

C.  Impossible Attempt.

 

 

Recommended Readings

 

1.      P.S. Pillia, Criminal Law.

2.      R.C. Nigam, Law of Crimes in India.

3.      K.D. Gaur, Cases and Materials on Criminal Law.

4.      H.S. Guar, Penal Law of India.

5.      S.N. Mishra, Indian Penal Code.

6.      Annual Survey of Indian Law, Indian Law Institute, New Delhi.

Testimonials